Jason’s Fitness 3724 Cottage Hill Rd. Mobile, Alabama  (251) 661-4615         Jason’s Fitness 120 W. Berry Ave. Foley, Al  36535  (251) 943-5591
One-On-One with Jason S. Greene The Exercise Ball Leg Curl Last   article   I   gave   you   a   brief   history   on   the   Swiss/exercise   ball   and   taught   you   a   great   exercise   for   your   hips, butt   and   core.      In   this   article   I   follow   up   with   the   next   natural   movement,   the   ball   leg   curl.      This   exercise   works   a lot   of   the   same   muscle   as   the   glute   bridge   exercise   with   the   addition   of   dynamic   hamstring   activation.      It   is   great for   fitness   and   phenomenal   for   athletes.      We   utilize   this   movement   for   developing   the   hamstrings.      For   those   of you   who   don’t   know   what   hamstrings   are,   they   are   the   pretty   half   moon   shaped   muscles   on   the   back   of   the   upper leg.  The   hamstrings   are   one   of   the   unsung   sexy   muscles   of   the   human   body.      Over   the   past   32-years   I   have   had many,   many,   women   come   to   me   and   ask   how   to   develop   them.      Most   didn’t   know   they   were   called   hamstrings, but   they   definitely   knew   they   wanted   to   see   them   in   the   mirror.      So,   if   you   want   to   tighten   up   your   backside   grab   a ball and let’s get started.    Starting   Position:   Lie   on   your   back   on   a   mat   or   carpet,   placing   the   backs   of   your   lower   legs and   heels   on   the   top   of   an   exercise   ball.   Place   your   feet   a   few   inches   apart   on   the   ball   with your   ankles   slightly   flexed.      Keep   your   arms   out   to   your   sides   with   the   palms   facing   down on the floor to help stabilize your body (Photo-A).   A:   While   keeping   the   abdominals/core   muscles   tight   lift   your   hips   up   off   the   floor.   The   backs of   your   lower   legs   and   heels   are   pressing   into   the   ball   to   assist   the   movement   and   provide stability.   Press   up   until   your   upper   body   and   legs   form   a   straight   line   with   each   other.     Avoid   pushing   your   hips   so   high   that   your   low   back   begins   to   arch.      Contracting   you abdominals/core   muscles   helps   prevent   excessive   arching   in   your   low   back.   Continue   to press   upwards   until   your   body   is   in   a   straight   line   from   your   heels   to   your   shoulder   blades (Photo-B).   B:   Exhale   and   slowly   bend   your   knees   and   pull   the   ball   toward   your   hips   until   you   can   rest the   soles   of   your   feet   on   top   of   the   ball.   Your   toes   may   point   away   from   your   body   in   this movement.   The   hips   will   continue   to   lift   as   you   pull   the   ball   toward   your   hips.   Keep   the   torso stable (Photo-C).   C:   Inhale   and   slowly   press   the   ball   away   from   your   hips   until   the   knees   are   straight, stabilizing   with   the   core,   hamstrings,   glutes   and   arms.   Repeat   for   8-10   repetitions   and   slowly lower yourself back towards your starting position.   To   increase   the   difficulty:   move   your   feet   closer   together   on   the   ball   and   or   move   your   hands   closer   or   onto   your body placing them onto your chest.   To   increase   intensity:      raise   one   leg   off   the   ball   in   the   starting   position   and   curl   with   one   leg.      Do   not   arch   your lower   back   as   you   press   your   hips   upward   to   the   starting   position.   This   is   accomplished   by   tightening   your abdominal/core muscles prior to lifting and keeping them tight throughout the movement. Disclaimer: One on One with Jason aims to provide general fitness and exercise information. Advice offered may not be applicable to all individuals and does not constitute medical, health or scientific fitness advice.  People have different needs, abilities and levels of health. It is recommended that all readers consult a medical professional before beginning any form of exercise, participate in any physical fitness or sports training program or undertake any form of health plan, nutrition program or weight loss diet, especially if you have been inactive most of your life, suffer from obesity or have any health problems.
(Photo-B). (Photo-C). (Photo-A).
Jason S. Greene Fitness Expert
One-On-One with Jason S. Greene The Exercise Ball Leg Curl Last   article   I   gave   you   a   brief   history   on   the   Swiss/exercise   ball   and taught   you   a   great   exercise   for   your   hips,   butt   and   core.      In   this   article   I follow   up   with   the   next   natural   movement,   the   ball   leg   curl.      This   exercise works   a   lot   of   the   same   muscle   as   the   glute   bridge   exercise   with   the   addition of   dynamic   hamstring   activation.      It   is   great   for   fitness   and   phenomenal   for athletes.      We   utilize   this   movement   for   developing   the   hamstrings.      For   those of   you   who   don’t   know   what   hamstrings   are,   they   are   the   pretty   half   moon shaped muscles on the back of the upper leg.  The   hamstrings   are   one   of   the   unsung   sexy   muscles   of   the   human   body.     Over   the   past   32-years   I   have   had   many,   many,   women   come   to   me   and   ask how   to   develop   them.      Most   didn’t   know   they   were   called   hamstrings,   but they   definitely   knew   they   wanted   to   see   them   in   the   mirror.      So,   if   you   want to tighten up your backside grab a ball and let’s get started.    Starting   Position:   Lie   on   your   back   on   a   mat   or   carpet, placing   the   backs   of   your   lower   legs   and   heels   on   the   top   of an   exercise   ball.   Place   your   feet   a   few   inches   apart   on   the ball   with   your   ankles   slightly   flexed.      Keep   your   arms   out   to your   sides   with   the   palms   facing   down   on   the   floor   to   help stabilize your body (Photo-A).   A:   While   keeping   the   abdominals/core   muscles   tight   lift your   hips   up   off   the   floor.   The   backs   of   your   lower   legs   and heels   are   pressing   into   the   ball   to   assist   the   movement and   provide   stability.   Press   up   until   your   upper   body   and legs   form   a   straight   line   with   each   other.      Avoid   pushing your   hips   so   high   that   your   low   back   begins   to   arch.      Contracting y   o   u     abdominals/core   muscles   helps   prevent   excessive   arching   in   your   low   back. Continue   to   press   upwards   until   your   body   is   in   a   straight   line   from   your heels to your shoulder blades (Photo-B).   B:   Exhale   and   slowly   bend   your   knees   and   pull   the   ball toward   your   hips   until   you   can   rest   the   soles   of   your   feet   on top   of   the   ball.   Your   toes   may   point   away   from   your   body   in this   movement.   The   hips   will   continue   to   lift   as   you   pull   the ball toward your hips. Keep the torso stable (Photo-C).   C:   Inhale   and   slowly   press   the   ball   away   from   your   hips   until   the   knees   are straight,   stabilizing   with   the   core,   hamstrings,   glutes   and   arms.   Repeat   for   8- 10 repetitions and slowly lower yourself back towards your starting position.   To   increase   the   difficulty:   move   your   feet   closer   together   on   the   ball   and   or move your hands closer or onto your body placing them onto your chest.   To   increase   intensity:      raise   one   leg   off   the   ball   in   the   starting   position   and curl   with   one   leg.      Do   not   arch   your   lower   back   as   you   press   your   hips upward   to   the   starting   position.   This   is   accomplished   by   tightening   your abdominal/core   muscles   prior   to   lifting   and   keeping   them   tight   throughout the movement. Disclaimer:   One   on   One   with   Jason   aims   to   provide   general   fitness   and   exercise   information.   Advice   offered   may   not   be applicable   to   all   individuals   and   does   not   constitute   medical,   health   or   scientific   fitness   advice.      People   have   different   needs, abilities   and   levels   of   health.   It   is   recommended   that   all   readers   consult   a   medical   professional   before   beginning   any   form   of exercise,   participate   in   any   physical   fitness   or   sports   training   program   or   undertake   any   form   of   health   plan,   nutrition   program or weight loss diet, especially if you have been inactive most of your life, suffer from obesity or have any health problems.
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Jason’s Fitness 3724 Cottage Hill Rd. Mobile, Alabama  (251) 661-4615         Jason’s Fitness 120 W. Berry Ave. Foley, Al  36535  (251) 943-5591
(Photo-B). (Photo-C). (Photo-A).
Jason S. Greene Fitness Expert
One-On-One with Jason S. Greene The Exercise Ball Leg Curl Last     article     I     gave     you     a     brief     history     on     the Swiss/exercise   ball   and   taught   you   a   great   exercise   for   your hips,   butt   and   core.      In   this   article   I   follow   up   with   the   next natural   movement,   the   ball   leg   curl.      This   exercise   works   a   lot of    the    same    muscle    as    the    glute    bridge    exercise    with    the addition   of   dynamic   hamstring   activation.      It   is   great   for   fitness and   phenomenal   for   athletes.      We   utilize   this   movement   for developing   the   hamstrings.      For   those   of   you   who   don’t   know what   hamstrings   are,   they   are   the   pretty   half   moon   shaped muscles on the back of the upper leg.  The   hamstrings   are   one   of   the   unsung   sexy   muscles   of   the human   body.      Over   the   past   32-years   I   have   had   many,   many, women   come   to   me   and   ask   how   to   develop   them.      Most   didn’t know   they   were   called   hamstrings,   but   they   definitely   knew they   wanted   to   see   them   in   the   mirror.      So,   if   you   want   to tighten up your backside grab a ball and let’s get started.    Starting   Position:   Lie   on   your   back   on   a   mat or   carpet,   placing   the   backs   of   your   lower legs   and   heels   on   the   top   of   an   exercise   ball. Place   your   feet   a   few   inches   apart   on   the   ball with   your   ankles   slightly   flexed.      Keep   your arms   out   to   your   sides   with   the   palms   facing down   on   the   floor   to   help   stabilize   your   body   (Photo- A).   A:     While     keeping     the     abdominals/core muscles   tight   lift   your   hips   up   off   the   floor. The   backs   of   your   lower   legs   and   heels   are pressing     into     the     ball     to     assist     the movement    and    provide    stability.    Press    up until    your    upper    body    and    legs    form    a straight   line   with   each   other.      Avoid   pushing   your   hips   so   high that     your     low     back     begins     to     arch.          Contracting     you abdominals/core   muscles   helps   prevent   excessive   arching   in your   low   back.   Continue   to   press   upwards   until   your   body   is   in a   straight   line   from   your   heels   to   your   shoulder   blades   (Photo- B).   B:   Exhale   and   slowly   bend   your   knees   and pull   the   ball   toward   your   hips   until   you   can rest   the   soles   of   your   feet   on   top   of   the   ball. Your   toes   may   point   away   from   your   body   in this   movement.   The   hips   will   continue   to   lift as   you   pull   the   ball   toward   your   hips.   Keep the torso stable (Photo-C).   C:   Inhale   and   slowly   press   the   ball   away   from   your   hips   until the   knees   are   straight,   stabilizing   with   the   core,   hamstrings, glutes   and   arms.   Repeat   for   8-10   repetitions   and   slowly   lower yourself back towards your starting position.   To   increase   the   difficulty:   move   your   feet   closer   together   on   the ball   and   or   move   your   hands   closer   or   onto   your   body   placing them onto your chest.   To   increase   intensity:      raise   one   leg   off   the   ball   in   the   starting position   and   curl   with   one   leg.      Do   not   arch   your   lower   back   as you   press   your   hips   upward   to   the   starting   position.   This   is accomplished   by   tightening   your   abdominal/core   muscles   prior to lifting and keeping them tight throughout the movement. Disclaimer:   One   on   One   with   Jason   aims   to   provide   general   fitness   and   exercise   information. Advice   offered   may   not   be   applicable   to   all   individuals   and   does   not   constitute   medical, health   or   scientific   fitness   advice.      People   have   different   needs,   abilities   and   levels   of   health. It   is   recommended   that   all   readers   consult   a   medical   professional   before   beginning   any   form of   exercise,   participate   in   any   physical   fitness   or   sports   training   program   or   undertake   any form   of   health   plan,   nutrition   program   or   weight   loss   diet,   especially   if   you   have   been   inactive most of your life, suffer from obesity or have any health problems.
(Photo-C). (Photo-A). (Photo-B).
Jason S. Greene Fitness Expert